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Theories of Distinction

Redescribing the Descriptions of Modernity

The essays in this volume formulate what is considered to be the preconditions for an adequate theory of modern society. The volume starts with an examination of the modern European philosophical and scientific tradition notably the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl.

The essays in this volume formulate what is considered to be the preconditions for an adequate theory of modern society.

Landscape Theories

A Brief Introduction

In the past decades, the discussion about theoretical approaches to the topic of 'landscape' has increased. This book presents the currently discussed theoretical approaches to landscape and shows its potentials and limits. The theoretical approaches are discussed on the basis of current questions, such as socialisation and the hybridisation of landscape, and combined with empirical results. This is followed by a discussion of the landscape policy operationalisation of theoretical considerations and empirical findings.

In the past decades, the discussion about theoretical approaches to the topic of 'landscape' has increased. This book presents the currently discussed theoretical approaches to landscape and shows its potentials and limits.

Social Theories of Risk and Uncertainty

An Introduction

Written by leading experts in the field, Social Theories of Risk and Uncertainty is an introduction to mainstream theorizing on risk and uncertainty in sociology. Provides an overview of the historical developments and conceptual aspects of risk Identifies why theorizing on risk is necessary and highlights specific sociological contributions to this field of research Explores key topics including risk society and reflexive modernization, culture and risk, governmentality and risk, systems theory and risk, and edgework and voluntary risk taking Offers a comprehensive look at the promises, pitfalls, and perspectives of risk theorizing

This volume is an excellent resource that offers a clear understanding of risk from a social science perspective and establishes the basis for further theorizing and future research.

Theories of the Information Society

Information is regarded as a distinguishing feature of our world. Where once economies were built on industry and conquest, we are now part of a global information economy. Pervasive media, expanding information occupations and the development of the internet convince many that living in an Information Society is the destiny of us all. Coping in an era of information flows, of virtual relationships and breakneck change poses challenges to one and all. In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster sets out to make sense of the information explosion, taking a sceptical look at what thinkers mean when they refer to the Information Society, and critically examining the major post-war approaches to informational development. The fourth edition of this classic study brings it up to date with new research and with social and technological changes – from the 'Twitter Revolutions' of North Africa, to financial crises that introduced the worst recession in a life time, to the emergence of social media and blogging – and reassesses the work of key theorists in the light of these changes. More outspoken than in previous editions, Webster urges abandonment of Information Society scenarios, preferring analysis of the informatization of long-established relationships. This interdisciplinary book is essential reading for those trying to make sense of social and technological change in the post-war era. It addresses issues of central concern to students of sociology, politics, geography, communications, information science, cultural studies, computing and librarianship.

This interdisciplinary book is essential reading for those trying to make sense of social and technological change in the post-war era.

Researching Theories of Crime and Deviance

Many textbooks provide summaries and critiques of criminological theories, which are often supported by empirical evidence. However, this evidence is only as good as the research methods that were used to generate it. Where do these "facts" come from, and how reliable are they? Researching Theories of Crime and Deviance offers a critical evaluation of the research methods that generate data, bridging the gap between theory and research in the study of crime and deviant behavior. This unique resource challenges students to carefully appraise--rather than blindly accept--the research techniques that are used to produce theories and scholarship. In clear and engaging language, noted criminologists Charis E. Kubrin, Thomas D. Stucky, and Marvin D. Krohn assess the various research methods that have been used to test nine theoretical perspectives of crime. As they examine the processes and challenges of conducting theoretically directed research, the authors focus on sampling, measurement, and analytical issues. Coverage includes: * Rational Choice/Deterrence Theory * Trait Theories * Social Disorganization Theory * Anomie/Strain Theory * Social Learning Theory * Social Control Theory * Labeling Theory * Conflict Theory * Integrated Theory A dynamic and compelling text, Researching Theories of Crime and Deviance demystifies the research process, encouraging students to become better informed readers and researchers. It serves as an excellent resource for criminological theory courses, graduate-level research methods courses, and seminars that take a close look at the development of criminological theory and/or methods.

Researching Theories of Crime and Deviance offers a critical evaluation of the research methods that generate data, bridging the gap between theory and research in the study of crime and deviant behavior.

Developmental Theories of Crime and Delinquency

In Developmental Theories of Crime and Delinquency, Terence P. Thornberry and his contributors show that criminal behavior is not a static human attribute, but ebbs and flows over the life course of the individual. Criminal behavior tends to follow a distinct psychological pattern. It is relatively uncommon during childhood, is initiated by most offenders during adolescence, flourishes during late adolescence and early childhood, and usually diminishes or disappears by the mid-twenties. This pattern is not characteristic of all people--some never commit crimes and others become career criminals--but it is a general description of the developmental pattern of criminal offenders. This pattern has profound implications for theories of crime and delinquency. Not only does it explain initiation into, maintenance of, and desistance from involvement in crime, it offers insight into why crime flourishes during adolescence. Traditional theories of crime and delinquency have often failed to distinguish among different phases of criminal careers. They tend to ignore developmental changes that occur across a person's life course, changes that coincide with and can explain the causes and patterns of criminal behavior. This paperback edition of the seventh volume of the distinguished series Advances in Criminological Theory moves us from static identifications of the criminal by presenting a broad range of developmental explanations of crime. Each contributor articulates a developmental or life course perspective in explaining how people become involved in delinquency and crime. Each covers a wide range of theoretical territory and reveals how a developmental perspective enhances the explanatory power of traditional theories of crime and delinquency. This volume is an invaluable tool for criminologists, sociologists, psychologists, and other professionals seeking to teach how crime and violence can be understood in our culture.

This volume is an invaluable tool for criminologists, sociologists, psychologists, and other professionals seeking to teach how crime and violence can be understood in our culture.

Integrated Developmental and Life-course Theories of Offending

Developmental and life-course criminology aims to provide information about how offending and antisocial behavior develops, about risk and protective factors at different ages, and about the effects of life events on the course of development. This volume advances knowledge about these theories of offender behavior, many of which have been formulated only in the last twenty years. It also integrates knowledge about individual, family, peer, school, neighborhood, community, and situational influences on offender behavior, and combines key elements of earlier theories such as strain, social learning, differential association, and control theory.Contributors Benjamin B. Lahey and Irwin D. Waldman focus on antisocial propensity and the importance of biological and individual factors. Alex R. Piquero and Terrie E. Moffitt distinguish between life-course-persistent and adolescent-limited offenders. David P. Farrington presents the Integrated Cognitive Antisocial Potential (ICAP) theory, which distinguishes between long-term and short-term influences on antisocial potential. Richard F. Catalano, J. David Hawkins, and their colleagues test the Social Development Model (SDM).Marc Le Blanc proposes an integrated multi-layered control theory, in which criminal behavior depends on bonding to society, psychological development, modeling, and constraints. Robert J. Sampson and John H. Laub hypothesize that offending is inhibited by the strength of bonding to family, peers, schools, and later adult social institutions such as marriage and jobs. Terence P. Thornberry and Marvin D. Krohn propose an interactional theory, of antisocial behavior. Per-Olof H. Witkstrom's developmental ecological action theory emphasizes the importance of situational factors: opportunities cause temptation, friction produces provocation, and monitoring and the risk of sanctions have deterrent effects.

This volume advances knowledge about these theories of offender behavior, many of which have been formulated only in the last twenty years.